commentary: public libraries are destroying the film industry

August 15th, 2007

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The public library system is destroying the film and book industries. Don’t believe me? Consider this.

I want to see a new DVD release. I could go to Blockbuster and pay my good honest American dollars to rent the movie, thus paying my dues to the creators of the film and rendering the cycle of capitalism complete.

But no! There is another option–one that allows you to get this movie for free using the power of the internet! How can one resist such a temptation? Am I talking about illegal filesharing? No! I’m talking about the public library system.

If I want to see a new film, I simply log on to the internet, select the movie I would like to see, and click on it. Then, I pick it up from the public library 2 blocks from my house. All without paying the movie studios or their hard-working employees a dime!

You might say, “but Trevor, the libraries pay for their copy originally!” Balderdash! So do illegal filesharers who rip a DVD in the first place. The library system is no different.

It’s not just movies either. The public library system in this county alone has hundreds of copies of the new Harry Potter book. Each copy is undoubtedly read by dozens of people. That comes out to thousands and thousands of copies of the book that consumers don’t have to buy! Poor, poor Mrs. Rowling.

Now you skeptics will say, it’s legal to get movies from the library, and it’s not from the internet. But what if it was the other way around. What if the library offered downloads of new films, and there was an illegal underground network of DVD sharing instead? This DVD-sharing network is robbing the movie studios legal or not.

The bottom line is, public libraries are destroying the film and book industries and we must stop them at all costs!

5 Responses to “commentary: public libraries are destroying the film industry”

  1. Library Stuff » Blog Archives » Copyright Killers Says:

    [...] Wonderfactory – “It’s not just movies either. The public library system in this county alone has hundreds of copies of the new Harry Potter book. Each copy is undoubtedly read by dozens of people. That comes out to thousands and thousands of copies of the book that consumers don’t have to buy! Poor, poor Mrs. Rowling.” Posted in Copyright | Trackback | del.icio.us | Top Of Page [...]

  2. SH Says:

    you obviously have not bothered to learn anything about the concept of ‘public lending rights’ which operate in many countries – copyright holders ARE reimbursed by these schemes for copies of their works held in public libraries (and similar schemes operate for works in academic libraries also). Personally, I borrow hundreds of books a year from my local public library – I would not, and could not, buy them all (if any) if they weren’t available in the library – so copyright holders aren’t losing a penny, but they are becoming more well known, which is ultimately to their benefit.

  3. trevor Says:

    Hmmm.
    Sounds like filesharing is a great way to become more well known too!
    Don’t know what the MPAA and RIAA are all in a huff about.
    I couldn’t afford to buy all these CDs and DVDs, so I borrow them from the internet! I wouldn’t buy them at all if they were not available for free!

    anyway–I am familiar with public lending rights to some degree–familiar enough to know that such a system is not in effect in the United States, where I am writing this.
    That set the stage for a piece of satire regarding filesharing in my mind.

  4. Daniel Says:

    I couldn’t understand some parts of this article ary: public libraries are destroying the film industry | wonderfactory.org, but I guess I just need to check some more resources regarding this, because it sounds interesting.

  5. ITEOTWAWKI Says:

    I know what you are talking about….. I KNOW…. You didn’t spell it out well, but I got it…. So, why care if it goes the way of dodo bird? The writers strike shows that this isn’t a stable industry, it’s just over production in a shrinking market. Look, in this case, we can’t change the rules after the game has started . Sorry guy, people want their libraries just the way they are, and that’s just the start… You mention capitalism, OK, think about this, If an industry is being hurt by an obviously, 100% legal process, then that was a bad business plan! Get out! Businesses take risks, if they fail, so be it. Let the market work it out, that’s capitalism. And it’s no secret that libraries have been a part of this market for well over 100 years, and we like it that way…., Look, if I bought 10,000 DVDs and let people borrow them for free, that’s my right, EVEN IF MY MOTIVE IS TO DESTROY AN INDUSTRY… If you want to try to stop us, be my guest……. But I warn you, there are more of US than U…… Keep on trolling & CYA in limbo bimbo…